Honors Interdisciplinary Seminars

HONR 3310-01
Building a (Better) Book

Time: Wed, Fri / 11:45am-1:25pm
CRN: 15643
NUpath: EI, IC

Ryan Cordell, Department of English
CSSH

In this studio-based course, students will investigate intersections among media, literature, and computation in order to understand the history of the book and imagine its future. Students will cultivate new technical skills that will enable them to effectively use a range of historical and contemporary textual technologies, including letterpress, binding, 3D printing, and interactive, online storytelling.  The course will draw extensively on resources such as Huskiana Press, NU’s new experiential letterpress studio, and Snell Library’s 3D Printing Studio. Students will use the skills they develop over the course of the semester to develop multimodal creative or research projects: in short, students will build their own print-digital books. As a studio course, “Building a (Better) Book” will center around students’ conceiving, developing, and workshopping these independent projects. In addition, the course will include a number of trips to archives and museums around the Boston area such as the Massachusetts Historical Society, local letterpress shops, and Boston Cyberarts.


HONR 3310-02
Examining Family Business Dynamics Through Film

Time: Tue / 5:20-8:20pm
CRN: 14933

Kimberly Eddleston, Entrepreneurship & Innovation
DMSB

Family businesses are the predominant form of business around the world. Yet, because of the inextricable link between the family and business, there is much diversity in their goals, values and how they are managed. Most unique to family businesses is the central role of the family and its influence on the business. An instrumental tool to discover, identify, and evaluate family relationships and family business dynamics is film. In this course, students will learn to critically analyze and evaluate family relationships and family business dynamics through the examination of various television shows and films and how they reflect research and theories. By watching, analyzing and discussing these films, the complexities of family businesses will come to life, offering students a unique glimpse into how family relationships impact the business and in turn, the business affects family relationships. By utilizing television shows and film, students will also have the opportunity to diagnose the roots of family conflicts and see how a ‘healthy family’ helps to ensure a ‘healthy business.’


HONR 3310-03
Pop Culture and Mental Health

Time: Mon, Thurs / 11:45am-1:25pm
CRN: 15785
NUpath: DD

Maureen Kelleher, Department of Sociology
CSSH

The social history of mental illness in the United States and the manner in which this health issue is portrayed cements a perspective of mental illness that is often linked to tensions between normality and social deviance. This course will track this tension by focusing on three broad themes. First, the course will situate the historical response to mental illness by tracking the emergence of the asylum movement in the United States through to present day mental health interventions. Second this course will explore how the category of mental illness is socially constructed and will address how gender, age and social class among other variables affect perceptions of who is mentally ill, why they are ill, and how we should respond to this “illness.” Finally, this course will assess how cultural forms such as contemporary film, fiction and memoirs have helped to shape our perceptions of mental illness and influence our contemporary public policy response. We will be using the lens of sociology to help frame our conversations.


HONR 3310-06
Slam Poetry and Social Justice

Time: Tue, Fri / 9:50-11:30am
CRN: 14883
NUpath: IC, EI

Ellen Noonan, Department of English
CSSH

The title of the course may seem fairly straightforward: Slam Poetry and Social Justice.  Those concepts, though, those “performances,” can be complicated (and I am using “complicated” as both verb and adjective here), and that complicating will be the work of our class.  We’ll start with questions: What is Slam Poetry? How is it made, performed? What is Social Justice? How is it made, performed? How do we integrate these so that poetry can work towards social justice, so that social justice might have poetry’s energy, immediacy, and grace? These are my opening questions: we will ask many more questions together, while also reading many kinds of texts, and writing, performing, and workshopping our own texts in a collaborative writing and learning space where all voices will be valued and heard.


HONR 3310-07
Legalizing Marijuana, the National Debt, and Import Tariffs: Contested Economic Issues

Time: Mon, Weds, Thurs / 1:35-2:40pm
CRN: 15924
NUpath: ER, SI

Peter Simon, Department of Economics
CSSH

In the large and complex economy of the United States, there is controversy over what goods and services should be produced. Should we legalize drugs or continue to fight the war on drugs? Should there be a limit to our national debt? What is the economic justification for import tariffs? In addition to the topics listed in the title, this course looks at the economic and ethical aspects of other issues such as mandatory vaccination, organ sales, death with dignity, and scalping. To understand the nature, the causes, and the ethical implications of these, and many other current controversial and contested issues, is the objective of this course. Students will work in pairs to conduct their own econometric study on contested issues, is the objective of this course.


HONR 3310-10
The Politics of Comedy

Time: Mon, Weds, Thurs / 1:35-2:40pm
CRN: 16188
NUpath: IC, WI

Patrick Mullen, Department of English
CSSH

This course will explore the politics of comedy through a diverse and eclectic set of texts—some of these works are examples of the comic—everything from novels and short stories to TV series and stand-up routines—and some are philosophical attempts to analyze just what comedy is. We will be considering works that span historical periods, genres, and languages. The long critical tradition in the West that has tried to define the comic has often been in conflict with the artists and writers producing comic works—what people have found funny, both highbrow and lowbrow, has not always aligned with what critics have deemed to be the culturally valuable or admirable aspects of comedy. We will be exploring both threads of this tradition, looking at the critical conversations about the comic in various contexts and examining the works that people at various times and places have found funny, grotesque, ludicrous, or ridiculous. Some of questions that we will pursue include: Is comedy culturally and historically bound or are there more universal aspects to the comic? Is the comic about the moral or ethical qualities of a particular individual? Is comedy a social mode that displays the values of an entire society? What’s funny about politics and what’s political about comedy? Students will be asked to analyze comedy critically and will also be given the chance create their own works of comedy that speak to issues they find important.


HONR 3310-11
Creating the Future: Transforming Health Care with Mobile Health (mHealth)

Time: Wed / 4:30-7:00pm
CRN: 16226

Misha Pavel, Professor of the Practice
Bouvé College of Health Sciences/ Khoury College of Computer Sciences

Healthcare needs innovative solutions that will help people live healthier and higher quality lives. Recent advances in mobile technology are enabling novel approaches to deliver care for people outside of clinics and hospitals. The emerging technologies offer promise for inferring health and mental conditions during people’s regular life by measuring unobtrusively and continuously physiological and behavioral facets. mHealth technologies can also use gathered data to deliver just-in-time interventions to help individuals make better health-related decisions. This course will introduce students to the principles and applications of this new technology in several areas. Students will first learn how to recognize health problems that would benefit from mHealth solutions and how to identify people who care about addressing those problems (stakeholders). Students will then learn to develop innovative and creative solutions using mHealth technologies as well as ways to test and evaluate their mHealth applications. The course will not require any prior programming experience: Students who do not wish to code can use a platform that my team has developed which will enable them to use existing components to develop their applications. Students who either know or wish to learn to code will be encouraged to learn how to program their phones to achieve more flexibility. Although getting hands-on experience will be an important part of their experience, students will also learn to incorporate principles of design, usability testing and evaluation in the mHealth domain. Student learning will be assessed on the basis of the innovative and creative solutions that students come up with on individual and group projects.


HONR 3310-12
Non-Fiction Writing and Social Justice Issues

Time: Mon / 5:00-8:00pm
CRN: 16227

Michael Patrick MacDonald, Professor of the Practice
University Honors Program

 

In order to write the most effective non-fiction around social justice issues, a writer might undertake personal reflection on his/her own life to access that “place” that allows for greater empathy. When we write about issues affecting other people’s lives, it is important to engage in a process of contemplation that will lead to more in-depth understanding, and create a unique and passionate “voice” that “brings the reader in.”

This is true, no matter where we come from or our degree of previous exposure to the issues at hand (it is my belief that one does not have to come from poverty to write effectively about poverty, come from domestic violence to write effectively about domestic violence etc.; however, I believe that one would be well served by accessing their own place of vulnerability in order to write empathically about social justice issues). In order to help students find their own writing voice, this seminar will engage students in critical thought and discussion of a wide range of social justice issues as well as grassroots movement for change.

 

Central unifying themes of the course will be class/poverty and its attendant violence, crime and other social issues, as well as its intersections with racism, gender, sexuality and other identities. We will also look at the intersection of justice-and-healing in grassroots efforts happening in our communities that have been most affected by these issues. In particular, we will approach Social Justice themes through a Restorative and Transformative Justice lens, which calls for shifts in the ways we communicate across perceived differences, rather than adversarial and fundamentalist Good vs Evil approaches that dominate Social Justice discourse (e.g. on social media and in classrooms) today. Therefore, the role of Empathy on and off the page will be our most central unifying theme, and concepts such as mutual aid and solidarity (rather than charity) will be explored.

 

Ultimately, we will focus on the implications for writers of non-fiction on these topics. This course will present an insider’s view into writing with a greater consciousness of social justice issues (in particular, questions of socio-economic inequality) by starting with some of the instructor’s own work, which includes two memoirs, a third memoir-in-progress and multiple essays. Secondly, the course will move outward to the works of other significant writers of non-fiction, using different writing approaches to related issues, whether through personalised journalism (also called “new journalism”), straight-journalism, or opinion/advocacy journalism or essay. What makes various approaches work effectively? What works for which audiences? How might the works influence contemporary social problems? Are there policy links to any of these writings? And most importantly for our purposes, how might a Restorative or Transformative thos be applied to the various approaches?

 

The course will frame a discussion of the many ways to write non-fiction about these central themes: as memoir, non-fiction books, journalism and essays (as well as other forms of dramatic writing, one-person shows, documentary film or other examples of social-issue-writing the class comes across in general popular culture).


HONR 3310-14
Violence and Public Health

Time: Mon, Thurs / 11:45am-1:25pm
CRN: 18176

Margo Lindauer, Director, Domestic Violence Institute
School of Law / Bouvé College of Health Sciences

This course will introduce students broadly to the topic of violence and public health with a specific focus on intimate partner violence, sexual assault, child abuse, elder abuse, and community violence. The course will explore the different topics from a variety of policy and legal frameworks and utilize our local community resources to do site visits, meet with leaders in the field and explore possible changes to policy that could assist in ameliorating these different public health crises.


HONR 3310-15
Hopscotch, Soccer, and Broccoli: Implications of Neuroscience for Promoting Children’s Brain Health

Time: Tues / 3:00-6:00pm
CRN: 18177
NUpath: ND

Lauren Raine, Department of Physical Therapy, Movement, and Rehabilitation Sciences
Bouvé College of Health Sciences

To what extent does brain health depend on lifestyle choices that are made early in life? This course highlights the implications of lifestyle factors on brain health during childhood and adolescence, with particular focus on factors such as physical activity, diet, obesity, and sleep. Various perspectives and methods for measuring lifestyle factors and brain health will be examined through readings, class discussions and exercises, and tours of various Northeastern laboratories. Students will be introduced to emerging methodologies and techniques in the field of neuroscience, including electroencephalogram (EEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and behavioral outcomes. Students will develop critical thinking and analytic skills as we use the scientific readings and laboratory observations to evaluate the quality of scientific evidence supporting the importance of particular lifestyle factors in promoting brain health. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to integrate knowledge emerging from multiple disciplines, including neuroscience, movement sciences, nutrition, and psychology.


HONR 3310-16
Social Fact from Fiction: Using Novels to Explore Contemporary Social Problems and Public Policy Reforms

Time: Wed / 5:00-8:00pm
CRN: 18178

David Rochefort, Department of Political Science
CSSH

There is a long tradition of concern in American fiction with emerging or neglected social problems. At its best, such work has had far-reaching effects, first in raising public awareness, and second in triggering public policy reforms. The purpose of this honors seminar will be to examine the way that novelists on the contemporary scene are using their writing to explore poverty, homelessness, mental illness, race relations, domestic abuse, and other important issues. By focusing on a series of noteworthy realist novels, this course aims to cover both the factual basis of the texts and the narrative devices, such as plotting, characterization, symbolism, reification, and normative judgment, that are used by authors to cast a spotlight on social problems and their impacts.


HONR 3310-17
The Art of Narrative Nonfiction

Time: Wed / 5:00-8:00pm
CRN: 18179

James Ross, Department of Journalism
CAMD

We will examine how long-form nonfiction has shaped our views of war, crime, mental health, racism and poverty. We will read and discuss groundbreaking books of the 20th and 21st century and explore the research and reporting as well as the narrative style of the authors. We also will critique films that examine these issues. Students lead class discussions about the historical, political, cultural and ethical issues that frame these books and films. The final project is a paper that delves into the meaning of narrative nonfiction.

HONR 3310-01
Examining Family Business Through Film – Online

Time: Online
CRN: 61281

Kimberly Eddleston, Entrepreneurship and Innovation
DMSB

Family businesses are the predominant form of business around the world. Yet, because of the inextricable link between the family and business, there is much diversity in their goals, values and how they are managed. Most unique to family businesses is the central role of the family and its influence on the business. An instrumental tool to discover, identify, and evaluate family relationships and family business dynamics is film. In this course, students will learn to critically analyze and evaluate family relationships and family business dynamics through the examination of various television shows and films and how they reflect research and theories. By watching, analyzing and discussing these films, the complexities of family businesses will come to life, offering students a unique glimpse into how family relationships impact the business and in turn, the business affects family relationships. By utilizing television shows and film, students will also have the opportunity to diagnose the roots of family conflicts and see how a ‘healthy family’ helps to ensure a ‘healthy business.’

HONR 3310-02
The Power of Language: Linguistic Diversity, Discrimination and Language Identity as a Human Right

Time: Tues, Thurs / 1:30 – 5:00pm / Online
CRN: 41414
NUpath: DD, SI

Heather Littlefield, Department of Linguistics
COS

We, as humans, enjoy the advantages that using language gives us on a daily basis, but most of us do so without much, if any, awareness of the complexities of the linguistic structures involved. Additionally, when we do consider the functions of language we most often focus on its communicative role, and overlook the crucial role that language plays in creating, maintaining, and negotiating social identity and status. Examining the social role of language allows us to understand how language is used to create personal and group identities, and how identities may interact with one another in efforts to include or exclude other social groups. In this course, we examine the intersection of language and social identity, using linguistics, the scientific study of language, as a foundation for our inquiry, drawing also from the fields of philosophy, sociology, and psychology to further inform our discussion. We use both historical and present-day case studies to examine how linguistic features play a powerful role in marking identity in areas such as race and ethnicity, social class, and gender, and how linguistic discrimination through microaggressions and human rights violations can create and maintain social inequality. Lastly, we consider how language may also be adopted as a tool to advance social justice. We will draw on a wide range of primary and secondary sources, including scholarly articles, literature, film, advertisements, news articles, blogs, and more, as we investigate the many facets of language and identity at the local, national, and global levels. In class sessions will largely comprise of lively discussions and workshops with hands-on data analysis. Students will extend the reach of the course content to the “real world” by developing a portfolio where they collect, document, and share instances and observations of the interaction of language and identity in their daily experiences.


HONR 3310-03
Building a (Better) Book

Time: Mon, Tues, Wed, Thurs / 9:50 – 11:30am / Online
CRN: 41415
NUpath: EI, IC

Ryan Cordell, Department of English
CSSH

What is a book, and what might it become? In this studio-based course, students investigate intersections among media, literature, and computation in order to understand the history of the book and imagine its future. Students cultivate new technical skills that will enable them to effectively use a range of historical and contemporary textual technologies, including letterpress, binding, 3D printing, and interactive, online storytelling. The course draws extensively on resources such as Huskiana Press, NU’s new experiential letterpress studio, and Snell Library’s 3D Printing Studio. Students use the skills they develop over the course of the semester to develop multimodal creative or research projects, building their own print-digital books. As a studio course, “Building a (Better) Book” centers around students’ conceiving, developing, and workshopping these independent projects. In addition, the course includes a number of trips to archives and museums around the Boston area such as the Massachusetts Historical Society, local letterpress shops, and Boston Cyberarts.

HONR 3310-01
Enabling the Sharing Economy with Computing Technology and Digital Business Model Innovations

Time: Mon. / 5:00-8:00pm
CRN: 35845
NU Path: EI

David Kaeli, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
COE

Co-taught with Yakov Bart, DMSB

The Sharing Economy can be characterized as an economic system of distributed networks and marketplaces that enables more effective and efficient access to underutilized and poorly managed assets and resources. The Sharing Economy is forecast to grow to over $335 billion by 2025. Technological innovations have allowed a variety of innovative business models to flourish, disrupting many mature industries and transforming the future of commerce, healthcare, transportation, lodging, energy, computing, and other services. More generally, growing Sharing Economy practices are transforming societies all over the world. 

This interdisciplinary course examines the Sharing Economy through two different lenses. First, we discuss the underlying computing technologies that have emerged to support more convenient and cost-effective access to assets and resources via sharing. Second, we examine the key economic drivers and building blocks of digital business transformations underlying the best practices of the Sharing Economy, and discuss how companies and governments can successfully take advantage of emerging multi-sided platforms and market-driven network externalities. We will explore both technological and consumer-based perspectives to highlight potential biases and discrimination arising in the Sharing Economy and consider various approaches for establishing fair and appropriate regulations and policies to mitigate such issues.


HONR 3310-05
Making the World a Better Place: a Course on the Ethics on Philanthropy

Time: Tues. 11:45am-1:25pm, Thurs. 2:50-4:30pm
CRN: 35854
NU Path: SI, ER

Patricia Illingworth, Department of Philosophy and Religion
CSSH

Given great global and domestic need, the moral imperative to help others is pressing and falls on the state, civil society, enterprises and individuals. In recent years philanthropy – the “love of humanity” – has received widespread attention. Warren Buffet, Bill and Melinda Gates, George Soros, Ted Turner and Oprah Winfrey have given incredible sums of money to help people globally and domestically. In addition, members of the middle class often give generously of their time, in the form of service, and financially. This course explores the ethical, social and political issues that arise in the context of philanthropy. Some of the questions to be considered are: Who should give? Are billionaires obligated to give more than the middle class? If so, how much more? Ought donors to receive a tax deduction when they give to charity, even when that reduces government revenue for other worthy causes? What are the obligations of corporations to give, and does that conflict with their obligations to investors? Does philanthropy undermine democracy? Are some charitable sectors morally more compelling and deserving than others? Is it better to give to global poverty or to the local symphony, and on the basis of what criteria should we make these decisions? Should nonprofits accept “tainted donations”? Our approach to these issues and others will be practical, critical and analytical; we draw on interdisciplinary readings from ethics, economics, political science, law, business, the social sciences.


HONR 3310-06
Cold War Spies

Times: Wed. / 5:00-8:00pm
CRN: 35855

Jeff Burds, Department of History
CSSH

Commonly referred to as the world’s “second oldest profession,” espionage is an intrinsic part of the relations between communities, institutions, and states, and an essential basis for policy decisions by world leaders. Drawing from a wide variety of published and unpublished primary and secondary sources, supplemented by modern theoretical and social science perspectives, literature, and films, this course explores the history of espionage during the Cold War era (1943-1991) and its immediate aftermath through a series of case studies. This lecture course will lead students through the history of covert operations over the past 50 years focusing on these sub-themes: the origins of the Cold War in World War II; the postwar battle for German scientists; Containment and Rollback; Venona and codebreaking; nuclear spies; defectors; proxy wars; insurgencies and counterinsurgencies; terrorism; technological espionage; cyberespionage; propaganda; the psychology of betrayal; and mind control (MKULTRA).

Each student will make two presentations on themes/readings to be negotiated with Professor Burds. Students may write two short (5-7 page) papers, or one longer paper based on those presentations.


HONR 3310-09
Online Creative Writing Workshop

Time: Online
CRN: 35862
NU Path: EI, WI

Ellen Noonan, Department of English
CSSH

Using language—writing, reading, etc.—is a social activity, one way to connect with others (past, present, future others)—and to document and, sometimes, to trouble, those connections. By thinking about and “practicing” language in this way, by adopting this approach, you will all see and practice how the rhetorical choices writers make are consequential, impacting not only the clarity of the sentences (an annoyingly persistent view of writing that reduces the complexity of writing (situations, circumstances, audiences, identities, genres…) to a simplistic exercise in skill building, i.e., learning the rules of a monolithic grammar), but also, and most importantly, the shaping of what is possible to think about, what is worth thinking about, what is worth writing about. The courses within the NU creative writing program are not, in fact, focused on “skill building” or THE right way to write; rather, they aim to raise your level of awareness, to make you conscious of the complex social nature of writing and reading, their dynamism and power. 

In this course, we will be using the “frame” of connections and connectedness (and disconnections and disconnectedness) alongside the concepts of “translating,” “borrowing,” and “adapting” to think about the “tools” that writing uses to construct identities— personal, social, private, public: How do you (how might you) use writing to create a space in the world? How is identity crafted? How is identity understood by others (your readers, your audience)? What tools are at your disposal as a maker? How do you negotiate the myriad choices of purpose and audience and tone and style? These questions have many answers, which I hope to explore with you; there are also many more questions to ask, which will—along with generating lots of “writing”— be our most important class activity.


HONR 3310-14
Witchcraft and Literature

Times: Tues, Fri. / 9:50-11:30am
CRN: 37180

Francis Blessington, Department of English
CSSH

Witchcraft is a worldwide phenomenon. In the West, it has had terrible consequences, but also it has been employed by many great writers, musicians, and artists to stimulate the imagination and create art, e.g., Homer, Shakespeare, Milton, Goethe, Mozart, Goya, Huxley, Updike. We shall explore the uses and abuses of sorcery and the human longing for magic and miracle in literature and other arts.


HONR 3310-15
Global Health: Art, Science, and Imagination

Times: Wed. / 4:30-7:30pm
CRN: 37181
NU Path: SI

Richard Wamai, Department of Cultures, Societies and Global Studies
CSSH

While it might have been the case in past decades that a disease experienced in one country “stayed” in that country or continent, this is no longer the case (think: bird flu in Asia or Ebola in Africa). With today’s unparalleled global mobility, it’s quite clear that what happens in one nation does affects others— and this is particularly true when we consider infectious diseases. With greater understanding that our planet is a dynamic system, it is critically important that we acknowledge that a disease in one nation can have worldwide consequences, and that we need to draw upon our imaginations, as well as science, to craft effective strategies for prevention and treatment. Global health provides a foundation and mechanism for identifying those factors that promote or threaten health in diverse contexts and with diverse populations, leading to implications for prevention, intervention, and hopefully, effective treatments. This interdisciplinary seminar provides a platform for curious students to explore the multifaceted new frontiers of global health in ways that span research, theory, practice, communication, and social action— the “art, science, and imagination” of health— all while learning how a new discipline, and set of professions, are emerging.


HONR 3310-16
Hopscotch, Soccer, and Broccoli: Implications of Neuroscience for Promoting Children’s Brain Health

Times: Tue. / 3:00-6:00pm
CRN: 37500
NU Path: ND

Lauren Raine, Department of Physical Therapy, Movement & Rehabilitation Science
Bouvé College of Health Sciences

To what extent does brain health depend on lifestyle choices that are made early in life? This course highlights the implications of lifestyle factors on brain health during childhood and adolescence, with particular focus on factors such as physical activity, diet, obesity, and sleep. Various perspectives and methods for measuring lifestyle factors and brain health will be examined through readings, class discussions and exercises, and tours of various Northeastern laboratories. Students will be introduced to emerging methodologies and techniques in the field of neuroscience, including electroencephalogram (EEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and behavioral outcomes.

Students will develop critical thinking and analytic skills as we use the scientific readings and laboratory observations to evaluate the quality of scientific evidence supporting the importance of particular lifestyle factors in promoting brain health.  Upon completion of the course, students will be able to integrate knowledge emerging from multiple disciplines, including neuroscience, movement sciences, nutrition, and psychology. 


HONR 3310-17
Exploring Race and Class in America

Times: Wed. / 4:40-7:30pm
CRN:  37856
NU Path: AD, DD

Jonathan Kaufman, School of Journalism
CAMD

Race and class are fundamental to understanding American history and grappling with the problems society faces today. Every day the media shapes how we view these issues, how we talk about them, how we vote on them. This class will examine how the media covers race and class–where it has done well, where it has done badly and how it can do better. We will read and watch seminal works on race and class in America and meet with journalists exploring the narrative and ethical challenges of telling these stories.


HONR 3310-18
Platform Business Models

Times: Mon, Thurs. / 11:45am-1:25pm
CRN: 37861

Kevin Boudreau, Department of Entrepreneurship and Innovation
DMSB

Many of today’s leading enterprises are organized as platforms. It is important to understand these new forms of organization, not just from a business and technological standpoint, but also because they have the potential to shape society, and the way people, businesses, and machines interact.

This course is an introduction to key themes and ideas shaping the “platform economy.” The course draws from latest research and goings-on in industry and society but is geared to a general audience without necessarily having any technical background in policy, economics, or business analysis. The instruction will introduce economic concepts and strategic frameworks in the context of real-world problems to attempt to clarify and cement concepts. In a sense, this is meant as an ‘introductory course to advanced concepts’ now beginning to shape our economy and beginning to research and careful scrutiny by business leaders and policymakers.

This course is designed to address, explore, and debate topics within class and in periodic assigned quizzes and readings. The course is designed to not require a final exam. This format places a higher burden on students to arrive to class prepared and to engage meaningfully on a regular basis.

Illustrative syllabus


HONR 3310-19
Mind, Body and Heart: Emerging Trends in Health Psychology

Time: Mon, Thurs. / 11:45am-1:25pm
CRN: 37863
NU Path: SI

Irina Torodova, Department of Applied Psychology
Bouvé College of Health Sciences

How do people experience their body, health and illness; what are cultural meanings that shape these experiences? What does psychology have to do with enjoying health and preventing illness? In this interdisciplinary seminar we will explore research about the connection between mind and body and how different experiences by gender, age, ethnicity, intersect with physical well-being. The study of the “mind-body connection”, more recently has added a contextual view of the psychology of health, illness and health. We will explore the theoretical and empirical basis of these ideas, how they are applied in practice, and employ a critical perspective to analyze their assumptions. This course is project-based and experiential. As we are learning about the interconnectedness of mind, body, and culture, we will also be able to reflect and apply these ideas to our own life.


HONR 3310-20
Visual Intelligence

Times: Wed. / 1:35-4:35pm
CRN: 37898
NU Path: IC

Gloria Sutton, Department of Art + Design
CAMD

This course teaches students to understand how to read, analyze and comprehend contemporary visual art as both artefact and act of public address. In contemporary culture, images and visual technologies are central to how we communicate, innovate and create. This interdisciplinary course introduces the skills of visual intelligence by combining powers of observation (formal description, visual data) with techniques of interpretation to sharpen perceptual awareness allowing students to develop compelling interpretations of visual art within a global context. 

This course is also designed to introduce students to a broad range of creative professionals who actively use visual intelligence in their dynamic careers. We will see experiments in visual thinking endemic to the fields of design, publishing, curation, conservation, and other areas of knowledge production in the visual arts. This course requires on site visits to conservation labs, studios, museums, gallery spaces and corporate art collections to gain first-hand experience.


HONR 3310-21
The Battle for Global Markets

Times: Mon. / 4:35-7:30pm
CRN: 37953
NU Path: SI

Jill Dupree, Department of Economics
CSSH

In this course, we will develop a foundational understanding of the economic theory of international trade policy. We will then use that knowledge to evaluate the causes and consequences of trade policy as it develops over the semester. In the process, we will explore the complex interaction between the economic political and social demands that shape global trade policy. This will be a student-led course, requiring data gathering, analysis, and presentation, both in teams and individually.


HONR 3310 – 22
Angels, Venture Capitalists, and Health: Entrepreneurship in the Health Sciences

Times: Mon, Thurs. / 11:45am-1:25pm
CRN: 38537

Jack Reynolds, School of Pharmacy
Bouvé College of Health Sciences

This course addresses principles of entrepreneurship and their applications in the healthcare industry, with particular relevance to health care ventures and technology.  The course includes explorations of different forms of business organizations, including sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, joint ventures and not-for-profit enterprises. Such explorations will help students identify and evaluate business skills and commitment necessary to successfully operate an entrepreneurial venture and address the challenges and rewards of entrepreneurship. Students will consider the requirements, costs and benefits of various forms of financial options open to entrepreneurs. Presentations and discussions in the course will be led by accomplished entrepreneurs and practitioners who are engaged in health care teaching, research and business.  Case studies will identify the challenges and rewards of successful entrepreneurial ventures that will set positive examples for budding entrepreneurs in leading change and innovation.


HONR 3310-23
Literature and Democracy

Times: Tues., Fri. / 9:50-11:30am
CRN: 38538
NU Path: IC, SI

Theo Davis, Department of English
CSSH

Plato’s Republic famously characterized the work of poets as dangerous to democracy, but modern literature and democracy have a long and intertwined history. This course will look at a core group of texts defining major ideas about democracy, both in the form of political theory and of literature. It focuses on themes of Education and Advancement, Revolution, Protest, Equality and Inequality, Consensus and Dissent, and Difference. It offers students a chance to develop a sharp understanding of these major themes in liberal theory and to explore how literature opens up discussions of political values and practices. It prepares students to face the challenges of civic life today, and to illuminate why literary and political discussions so often go together in the modern university.


HONR 3310-24
Law, Public Policy, and Human Behavior

Times: Mon., Wed. / 2:50-4:30pm
CRN: 38539
NU Path: SI

Richard Daynard
School of Law

Many public policies and legal decisions rest on the assumption that each individual can best understand what would make himself or herself happy, and that governmental limitations on choice must therefore make people less happy. This seminar will challenge this “rational actor”; model, suggesting that it mis-describes human self-understanding and behavior. We will test this in a variety of contexts, including behaviors like eating, smoking and gambling, the behavior of various actors in the legal system including judges, juries, experts, eyewitnesses, and prosecutors, how we approach health, health care, and “informed consent”, and implications for the environment, global warming and the future of our species. Students are expected to participate actively in seminar discussions, and to write a paper testing “rational actor”; assumptions in an area of their choosing.