Honors Interdisciplinary Seminars

Theodora Christopher

Theodora Christopher, COS'21

“[Angels, Venture Capitalists, and Health: Entrepreneurship in the Health Sciences, with Prof. Jack Reynolds] was an eye-opening experience that introduced me to the world of entrepreneurship. I am a pre-med student and never thought that business would be relevant to me, but this class challenged my preconception.”

Kritika Singh

Kritika Singh, COE'20

“I took an Honors Seminar called ‘Cloud, Closet, and Dropbox’ on examining various storage technologies. It was an amazing class that helped me learn how to communicate and read in a new and interesting way.”

HONR 3310-01
Contemporary Issues in Healthcare

Time: Mon, Thur / 11:45am-1:25pm
CRN: 18376
NU path: SI, EX

Lorna Hayward, Department of Physical Therapy
Bouvé College of Health Sciences

This course is a service-learning, interprofessional, Honors seminar that is project-based and involves examination of the complexity of issues related to a community defined health need. We will explore modern health care issues at the individual, local, national, and global levels. The US health care system will be presented historically from 1850 to current day. Health decisions will be discussed from multiple perspectives including: historical, political, ethical, financial, technological, and epidemiological. From there, students will develop an understanding of the complexity of health care concerns and the impact on the participants at their community sites.


HONR 3310-02
The Ethics of Philanthropy: What COVID-19 Can Teach us About our Responsibilities to Help Others

Times: Mon, Thur / 11:45am-1:25pm
CRN: 18676
NU path: SI, ER

Patricia Illingworth, Department of Philosophy and Religion
CSSH

Given the health and economic crisis created by COVID-19, globally and domestically, this course looks at the moral and human rights responsibilities of philanthropists and civil society. We will compare past giving practices with giving practices during COVID-19 to see whether donors have pivoted to meet the urgency of the pandemic. Using moral and political theories, law, and public policy, we will critically evaluate how donors contribute to the public good, and whether and how their giving practices can be improved.


HONR 3310-03
Social Fact from Fiction: Using Novels to Explore Contemporary Social Problems and Public Policy Reforms

Times: Tue / 11:45am-1:25pm; Thur / 2:50-4:30pm
CRN: 16126

David Rochefort, Department of Political Science
CSSH

Harriet Beecher Stowe and slavery. Upton Sinclair and unhealthy working conditions. John Steinbeck and the Great Depression. Richard Wright and racial inequality. There is a long tradition of concern in American fiction with emerging or neglected social problems. At its best, such work has had far-reaching effects, first in raising public awareness, and second in triggering public policy reforms. The purpose of this Honors seminar will be to examine the way that novelists on the contemporary scene are using their writing to explore homelessness, mental illness, race relations, domestic violence, immigration, pandemic disease, and other important social issues. Reading fiction can be a powerful experience that brings together the historical, social, and personal dimensions of life in our society. By focusing on a series of noteworthy realist novels, this course aims to cover both the factual basis of the texts and the narrative devices, such as plotting, characterization, symbolism, subjective description, and normative judgment, used by authors to cast a spotlight on social problems and their impacts.


HONR 3310-04
Non-Fiction Writing and Social Justice Issues

Times: Mon / 5:00-8:00pm
CRN: 14886

Michael Patrick MacDonald, Professor of the Practice
University Honors Program

In order to write the most effective non-fiction around social justice issues, a writer might undertake personal reflection on his/her own life to access that “place” that allows for greater empathy. When we write about issues affecting other people’s lives, it is important to engage in a process of contemplation that will lead to more in-depth understanding, and create a unique and passionate “voice” that “brings the reader in.”

This is true, no matter where we come from or our degree of previous exposure to the issues at hand (it is my belief that one does not have to come from poverty to write effectively about poverty, come from domestic violence to write effectively about domestic violence etc.; however, I believe that one would be well served by accessing their own place of vulnerability in order to write empathically about social justice issues). In order to help students find their own writing voice, this seminar will engage students in critical thought and discussion of a wide range of social justice issues as well as grassroots movement for change.

Central unifying themes of the course will be class/poverty and its attendant violence, crime and other social issues, as well as its intersections with racism, gender, sexuality and other identities. We will also look at the intersection of justice-and-healing in grassroots efforts happening in our communities that have been most affected by these issues. In particular, we will approach Social Justice themes through a Restorative and Transformative Justice lens, which calls for shifts in the ways we communicate across perceived differences, rather than adversarial and fundamentalist Good vs Evil approaches that dominate Social Justice discourse (e.g., on social media and in classrooms) today. Therefore, the role of Empathy on and off the page will be our most central unifying theme, and concepts such as mutual aid and solidarity (rather than charity) will be explored.

Ultimately, we will focus on the implications for writers of non-fiction on these topics. This course will present an insider’s view into writing with a greater consciousness of social justice issues (in particular, questions of socio-economic inequality) by starting with some of the instructor’s own work, which includes two memoirs, a third memoir-in-progress and multiple essays. Secondly, the course will move outward to the works of other significant writers of non-fiction, using different writing approaches to related issues, whether through personalized journalism (also called “new journalism”), straight-journalism, or opinion/advocacy journalism or essay.

What makes various approaches work effectively? What works for which audiences? How might the works influence contemporary social problems? Are there policy links to any of these writings? And most importantly for our purposes, how might Restorative or Transformative Justice  be applied to the various approaches?

The course will frame a discussion of the many ways to write non-fiction about these central themes: as memoir, non-fiction books, journalism and essays (as well as other forms of dramatic writing, one-person shows, documentary film or other examples of social-issue-writing the class comes across in general popular culture).


HONR 3310-05
Found Poetry Workshop

Times: Tue, Fri / 9:50am-11:30am
CRN: 18678
NU path: EI

Ellen Noonan, Department of English
CSSH

First, in a course that’s really about “borrowing” to compose our own work, let me start by borrowing from Annie Dillard:

“Happy poets who write found poetry go pawing through popular culture like sculptors on trash heaps. They hold and wave aloft usable artifacts and fragments: jingles and ad copy, menus and broadcasts — all objet trouvés, the literary equivalents of Warhol’s Campbell’s soup cans and Duchamp’s bicycle. By entering a found text as a poem, the poet doubles its context. The original meaning remains intact, but now it swings between two poles. The poet adds, or at any rate increases, the element of delight. This is an urban, youthful, ironic, cruising kind of poetry. It serves up whole texts, or interrupted fragments of texts.”

In Found Poetry Workshop, we will all be “happy poets.” Though we will look at examples of the form—via Found Poetry Review’s archives and texts like Charles Simic’s Dime Store Alchemy and Mary Ruefle’s A Little White Shadow, to name a few—most of the class will be hands-on: making/composing individual and group found (and interdisciplinary!) texts, and workshopping what we make/compose. Forms and practices will include (but will not be limited to): erasures, centos, cut-ups, 3-D poems, and remixes.


HONR 3310-06
Hopscotch, Soccer, and Broccoli: Implications of Neuroscience for Promoting Children’s Brain Health

Time: Tue / 3:30-6:30pm
CRN: 18925
NUpath: ND

Lauren Raine, Department of Physical Therapy, Movement, and Rehabilitation Sciences
Bouvé College of Health Sciences

This course assists the learner in answering the question: To what extent does brain health depend on lifestyle choices that are made early in life? This course highlights the implications of lifestyle factors on brain health during childhood and adolescence, with particular focus on factors such as physical activity, diet, obesity, and sleep. Various scientific perspectives and methods for measuring lifestyle factors and brain health will be examined through readings, in class discussions and exercises, and observational opportunities of various Northeastern laboratories. Students will be introduced to emerging methodologies and techniques in the field of neuroscience, including electroencephalogram (EEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and behavioral outcome measures. Students will develop critical thinking and analytic skills as we use the scientific readings and laboratory observations to evaluate the quality of scientific evidence supporting the importance of particular lifestyle factors in promoting brain health. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to integrate knowledge emerging from multiple disciplines, including neuroscience, movement sciences, nutrition, and psychology as it applies to brain health.


HONR 3310-07
Witchcraft and Literature

Times: Mon, Wed, Thur / 1:35-2:40pm
CRN: 18298

Francis Blessington, Department of English
CSSH

Witchcraft is a worldwide phenomenon. In the West, it has had terrible consequences, but also, it has been employed by many great writers, musicians and artists to stimulate the imagination and create art, e.g., Homer, Shakespeare, Milton, Goethe, Mozart, Goya, Huxley, Updike. We shall explore the uses and abuses of sorcery and the human longing for magic and miracle in literature and other arts.


HONR 3310-09
Racial Dialogues, Social Disparities and Hate Crimes in Shaping Public Policy 

Times: Mon, Wed / 4:35-5:40pm; Wed / 6:00-7:30p
CRN: 18980

Ted Landsmark, Department of Public Policy and Urban Affairs
CSSH

Racial disparities in access to services and opportunities, and hate crimes, are major focuses shaping urban policy planning and investment. This course explores how racial dialogues among Black, Asian, Latinx and Jewish groups can focus the development of equitable policies and practices affecting the future of our cities. Students in the course will also participate in the Myra Kraft Open Classroom Series, scheduled for Wednesday evenings throughout the Fall 2021 semester, which will feature a rich variety of talks and discussions on these issues.


HONR 3310-10
Contested Issues in the US Economy

Times: Mon, Wed, Thur / 1:35-2:40p
CRN: 19180
NU path: SI, ER

Peter Simon , Department of Economics
CSSH

In the large and complex economy of the United States, there is controversy over what goods and services should be produced. Should we legalize drugs or continue to fight the war on drugs? Should there be a limit to our national debt? What is the economic justification for import tariffs? In addition to the topics listed in the title, this course looks at the economic and ethical aspects of other issues such as mandatory vaccination, organ sales, death with dignity, and scalping. To understand the nature, the causes, and the ethical implications of these, and many other current controversial and contested issues, is the objective of this course. Students will work in pairs to conduct their own econometric study on contested issues, is the objective of this course.


HONR 3310-11
Creating the Future: Transforming Healthcare with Mobile Health

Times: Wed / 4:35-8:05p
CRN: 19295

Stephen Intille Khoury College of Computer Sciences

Proactive healthcare needs innovative, economically feasible solutions that will help people live healthier and higher quality lives. Recent advances in mobile technology are enabling novel approaches to deliver care for people outside of traditional approaches based on clinics and hospitals. Mobile Health (mHealth) and wearable technologies can also be used to gather data to deliver just-in-time interventions to help individuals make better health-related decisions. This course will introduce students to innovative approaches that utilize the principles and applications of this new technology in several areas. Students will first learn how to recognize health problems that would benefit from mHealth solutions and how to identify people who care about addressing those problems (stakeholders). Students will then learn to develop innovative and creative solutions using mHealth technologies, as well as ways to test and evaluate their mHealth applications.


HONR 3310-12
Examining Family Business through Film

Times: Tue / 5:20-8:20p
CRN: 19339

Kimberly Eddleston, Entrepreneurship and Innovation
DMSB

Family businesses are the predominant form of business around the world. Yet, because of the inextricable link between the family and business, there is much diversity in their goals, values and how they are managed. Most unique to family businesses is the central role of the family and its influence on the business. An instrumental tool to discover, identify, and evaluate family relationships and family business dynamics is film. In this course, students will learn to critically analyze and evaluate family relationships and family business dynamics through the examination of various television shows and films and how they reflect research and theories. By watching, analyzing and discussing these films, the complexities of family businesses will come to life, offering students a unique glimpse into how family relationships impact the business and in turn, the business affects family relationships. By utilizing television shows and film, students will also have the opportunity to diagnose the roots of family conflicts and see how a “healthy family” helps to ensure a “healthy business.”

HONR 3310-01
Language and Power: Linguistic Diversity, Discrimination and Language Identity as a Human Right

Time: Does Not Meet (Online Asynchronous)
CRN: 41522
NUpath: DD, SI

Heather Littlefield, Linguistics
COS

As humans, we use language every day, usually without even thinking about it! But we rarely consider our linguistic biases and beliefs, and how they might relate to discrimination and social justice resulting in microagressions, denial of educational, employment, and housing opportunities, or even forced assimilation of minority groups. In this course we examine the critical role that language plays in how we negotiate and establish social identity and status, drawing on linguistics (the scientific study of language), philosophy, sociology, and psychology. We will explore African American, Latinx, Asian, Native American, gendered linguistic experiences, among others, with an eye to understanding how language beliefs and attitudes play a critical role in establishing and maintaining power and equity.


HONR 3310-02
Language and Power: Linguistic Diversity, Discrimination and Language Identity as a Human Right

Time: Does Not Meet (Online Asynchronous)
CRN: 41694
NUpath: DD, SI

Heather Littlefield, Linguistics
COS

As humans, we use language every day, usually without even thinking about it! But we rarely consider our linguistic biases and beliefs, and how they might relate to discrimination and social justice resulting in microagressions, denial of educational, employment, and housing opportunities, or even forced assimilation of minority groups. In this course we examine the critical role that language plays in how we negotiate and establish social identity and status, drawing on linguistics (the scientific study of language), philosophy, sociology, and psychology. We will explore African American, Latinx, Asian, Native American, gendered linguistic experiences, among others, with an eye to understanding how language beliefs and attitudes play a critical role in establishing and maintaining power and equity.

HONR 3310-02
Examining Family Business Dynamics through Film

Times: Does Not Meet (Online Asynchronous)
CRN: 61216

Kimberly Eddleston, Entrepreneurship and Innovation
DMSB

Family businesses are the predominant form of business around the world. Yet, because of the inextricable link between the family and business, there is much diversity in their goals, values and how they are managed. Most unique to family businesses is the central role of the family and its influence on the business. An instrumental tool to discover, identify, and evaluate family relationships and family business dynamics is film. In this course, students will learn to critically analyze and evaluate family relationships and family business dynamics through the examination of various television shows and films and how they reflect research and theories. By watching, analyzing and discussing these films, the complexities of family businesses will come to life, offering students a unique glimpse into how family relationships impact the business and in turn, the business affects family relationships. By utilizing television shows and film, students will also have the opportunity to diagnose the roots of family conflicts and see how a “healthy family” helps to ensure a “healthy business.”

HONR 3310-05
The Ethics of Philanthropy: What COVID-19 Can Teach us About our Responsibilities to Help Others

Time: Tue, Fri / 9:50-11:30am (Remote Synchronous)
CRN: 34417
NUpath: SI, ER

Patricia Illingworth, Department of Philosophy and Religion
CSSH

ven the health and economic crisis created by COVID-19,  globally and domestically, this course looks at the moral and human rights responsibilities of philanthropists and civil society.  We will compare past giving practices with giving practices during COVID-19 to see whether donors have pivoted to meet the urgency of the pandemic. Using moral and political theories, law, and public policy, we will critically evaluate how donors contribute to the public good, and whether and how their giving practices can be improved.


HONR 3310-06
Cold War Spies

Time: Mon / 5:00-8:00pm
CRN: 34418

Jeffrey Burds, Department of History
CSSH

“There are very few reliable histories of espionage, and with good cause. The sources lie, are lost, are nonexistent, are withheld. Journalists (often) lack the patience, scholars (often) lack the clout to gain access, to stay the course, to outlast those who would with both good and malign intent seek to influence the writer’s conclusions.”

  • Robin Winks, 1994

 

Commonly referred to as the world’s “second oldest profession,” espionage is an intrinsic part of the relations between communities, institutions, and states, and an essential basis for policy decisions by world leaders. Drawing from a wide variety of published and unpublished primary and secondary sources, supplemented by modern theoretical and social science perspectives, literature, and films, this course explores the history of espionage during the Cold War era (1943-1991) and its immediate aftermath, through a series of case studies. This lecture course will lead students through the history of covert operations over the past 50 years focusing on these sub-themes: the origins of the Cold War in War World II; the postwar battle for German scientists; Containment and Rollback; Operation Gladio, Venona and codebreaking; nuclear spies; defectors; proxy wars; insurgencies and counterinsurgencies; terrorism; technological espionage; cyberespionage; propaganda; the psychology of betrayal; and mind control (MKULTRA). Each student will make two presentations on themes/readings to be negotiated with Professor Burds. Students may write two short (5-7 page) papers, or one longer paper based on those presentations.



HONR 3310-09
Creative Writing Workshop Online

Time: Does Not Meet (Online)
CRN: 34419
NUpath: WI, EI

Ellen Noonan, Department of English
CSSH

Using language—writing, reading, etc.—is a social activity, one way to connect with others (past, present, future others)—and to document and, sometimes, to trouble, those connections. By thinking about and “practicing” language in this way, by adopting this approach, you will all see and practice how the rhetorical choices writers make are consequential, impacting not only the clarity of the sentences (an annoyingly persistent view of writing that reduces the complexity of writing (situations, circumstances, audiences, identities, genres…) to a simplistic exercise in skill building, i.e., learning the rules of a monolithic grammar), but also, and most importantly, the shaping of what is possible to think about, what is worth thinking about, what is worth writing about.

 

The courses within the NU creative writing program are not, in fact, focused on “skill building” or THE right way to write; rather, they aim to raise your level of awareness, to make you conscious of the complex social nature of writing and reading, their dynamism and power.  In this course, we will be using the “frame” of connections and connectedness (and disconnections and disconnectedness) alongside the concepts of “translating,” “borrowing,” and “adapting” to think about the “tools” that writing uses to construct identities— personal, social, private, public: How do you (how might you) use writing to create a space in the world? How is identity crafted? How is identity understood by others (your readers, your audience)? What tools are at your disposal as a maker? How do you negotiate the myriad choices of purpose and audience and tone and style? These questions have many answers, which I hope to explore with you; there are also many more questions to ask, which will—along with generating lots of “writing”— be our most important class activity.


HONR 3310-15
Global Health: Art, Science, and Imagination

Time: Wed / 4:40-7:40pm
CRN: 34994
NUpath: SI

Richard Wamai, Department of Cultures, Societies and Global Studies
CSSH

While it might have been the case in past decades that a disease experienced in one country “stayed” in that country or continent, this is no longer the case (think: Ebola in Africa, Zika in South America,  SARS in Asia, MERS in the Middle East, or COVID-19!). With today’s unparalleled global mobility, it’s quite clear that what happens in one nation does affects others— and this is particularly true when we consider infectious diseases. With greater understanding that our planet is a dynamic system, it is critically important that we acknowledge that a disease in one nation can have worldwide consequences, and we recognize a greater need for moral imagination. Global health provides a foundation and mechanism for identifying those factors that promote or threaten health in diverse contexts and with diverse populations, leading to implications for prevention, intervention, and hopefully, effective treatments. This interdisciplinary seminar provides a platform for curious students to explore the multifaceted new frontiers of global health in ways that span research, theory, practice, communication, and social action— the “art and science” of health— all while learning how a new disciplinary imagination and set of professions emerge.


HONR 3310-18
Platform Business Models

Time: Mon, Thurs / 11:45am-1:25pm
CRN: 35577

Kevin Boudreau, Entrepreneurship and Innovation
DMSB

Many of today’s leading enterprises are organized as platforms. It is important to understand these new forms of organization, not just from a business and technological standpoint, but also because they have the potential to shape society and the way people, businesses, and machines interact.

 

This course is an introduction to these key themes and ideas shaping organizations and competition, largely via platforms, as the economy digitizes. The course draws from latest research and goings-on in industry and society. The instruction will introduce economic concepts and strategic frameworks in the context of real-world problems to attempt to clarify and cement concepts. The applied problem-solving in the course will most often take the form of active group discussion of cases and strategic problems faced by leaders at platform organizations.

 

In completing this course, you should gain a series of tools and concepts to help you analyze and also to creatively design platform businesses. You should also become a more astute observer and critical analyst of the role of this new form of organization in the economy and society. Emphasis will be placed on strategic and economic frameworks. The material is designed to be accessible to students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds including business, engineering, computer science, economics, data science, design, science, humanities, health sciences, law, social science, and so on.


HONR 3310-19
Mind, Body and Heart: Emerging Trends in Health Psychology

Time: Mon, Thurs / 11:45am-1:25pm
CRN: 35579
NUpath: SI

Irina Todorova, Department of Applied Psychology
Bouvé College of Health Sciences

Introduces the field of health psychology, which studies the role of psychology in health, illness, and healthcare. Topics include sustaining and promoting health, as well as experiencing illness and the body. Discusses focusing on people’s behaviors, perceptions, emotions, and understandings of health and illness, within the contexts of relationships and culture. The seminar also discusses how the theories and concepts of health psychology are instrumental in health promotion and prevention (including relevance to students’ own well-being). Specific themes include the biopsychosocial model of health; stress, coping, and social support; health-promoting and health-risk behaviors; behavior change theories and approaches; gender and health; health disparities; and the relevance of health psychology for health promotion.


HONR 3310-24
Law, Public Policy and Human Behavior

Time: Mon, Wed / 2:50-4:30pm
CRN: 36227
NUpath: SI

Richard Daynard, School of Law

Many public policies and legal decisions rest on the assumption that each individual can best understand what would make himself or herself happy, and that governmental limitations on choice must therefore make people less happy. This seminar will challenge this “rational actor” model suggesting that it mis-describes human self-understanding and behavior. We will test this in a variety of contexts, including behaviors like eating, smoking and gambling, the behavior of various actors in the legal system including judges, juries, experts, eyewitnesses, and prosecutors, how we approach health, health care, and “informed consent,” and implications for the environment, global warming and the future of our species. Students are expected to participate actively in seminar discussions, and to write a paper testing “rational actor” assumptions in an area of their choosing.


HONR 3310-25
Say it Loud!: The Black Power Movement and Higher Education

Time: Mon, Wed, Thurs / 1:35-2:40pm (Remote Synchronous)
CRN: 37736
NUpath: DD

Vanessa Johnson, Department of Applied Psychology
Bouvé College of Health Sciences

This course explores the impact of the Black Power Movement (1965-1975) on American colleges and universities.  Following a grounding in the history of the movement and its relationship to the Civil Rights Movement, students will explore the various impacts of Black Power on contemporary higher education. The course traces how the movement led to distinct ideologies, scholarship, practices, and terminology that provided new lenses through which institutions of higher education viewed Negros in terms of the preservation, transmittal, and enrichment of their culture by means of instruction, scholarly work, and scientific research.


HONR 3310-26
Digital Civil Rights

Time: Tue, Fri / 3:25-5:05pm
CRN: 37737

Ari Waldman, School of Law

This seminar focuses on how our most fundamental freedoms and liberties are affected by new and advancing technologies. Our reading will be a combination of judicial decisions, legal and sociological scholarship and more popular sources. The chief goal of this seminar is to get us thinking about the ways technology changes society, using civil liberties as a case study, with the hope that the discussions spark more complex theorizing about the effects of technology, particularly on marginalized populations and what, if anything, we can do about it.


HONR 3310-27
Paradoxes and Puzzles in Contemporary Thought

Time: Mon, Wed, Thurs / 10:30-11:35am (Remote Synchronous)
CRN: 37738

Branden Fitelson, Department of Philosophy and Religion
CSSH

Every area of contemporary thought (from the sciences to philosophy, religion and the arts) faces its own distinctive paradoxes and puzzles. By examining these conundrums, we can gain deep insights into the nature (and philosophical foundations) of various disciplines. This course provides a novel and application-oriented introduction to modern philosophy and its relation to many other parts of inquiry. No background in philosophy (or the other disciplines discussed) will be assumed.


HONR 3310-29
Enabling the Platform Economy with Computing Technology and Digital Business Transformations

Time: Thurs / 5:00-8:00pm
CRN: 37740
NU Path: EI

David Kaeli, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
COE

Co-taught with Yakov Bart, Department of Business
DMSB

The increasing digitization of the economy and the accelerating rise of platform-based businesses has been changing not just the kind of products and services that companies produce but fundamentally altering the way they generate value and deliver it to final customers. New computing technologies have allowed a variety of innovative business models to flourish, disrupting many mature industries and transforming the future of commerce, healthcare, transportation, lodging, energy, computing, and other industries. McKinsey experts believe that by 2025 over $60 trillion (about 30 percent of total world revenue that year) will be mediated by digital platforms, and yet only 3% of established companies have adopted an effective platform strategy. As the platform economy evolves, there are both new opportunities as well as new challenges that arise with heightened complexity.

 

This interdisciplinary course examines the platform economy through two different lenses. First, we discuss the underlying computing technologies that have emerged to support more convenient and cost-effective access to assets and resources via platforms and sharing mechanisms. Second, we examine the key economic drivers and building blocks of digital business transformations underlying the best practices of the platform economy and discuss how companies and governments can successfully take advantage of emerging multi-sided platforms and market-driven network externalities. We will explore both technological and consumer-based perspectives to highlight potential biases and discrimination arising in the platform economy and consider various approaches for establishing fair and appropriate regulations and policies to mitigate such issues.


HONR 3310-30
Entrepreneurship in Health Sciences 

Time: Tue, Fri / 8:00-9:40am
CRN: 37874

Jack Reynolds, Department of Pharmacy and Health Systems Science
Bouvé College of Health Sciences

This course addresses principles of entrepreneurship and their applications in the health care industry, with particular relevance to health care ventures and technology. Students will consider the requirements, costs and benefits of various forms of financial options open to entrepreneurs. Presentations and discussions in the course will be led by accomplished entrepreneurs and practitioners who are engaged in health care teaching, research and business. Case studies will identify the challenges and rewards of successful entrepreneurial ventures that will set positive examples for budding entrepreneurs in leading change and innovation.


HONR 3310-31
Examining Family Business Dynamics through Film

Times: Tue / 5:20-8:20pm
CRN: 39220

Kimberly Eddleston, Entrepreneurship and Innovation
DMSB

Family businesses are the predominant form of business around the world. Yet, because of the inextricable link between the family and business, there is much diversity in their goals, values, and how they are managed. Most unique to family businesses is the central role of the family and its influence on the business. An instrumental tool to discover, identify, and evaluate family relationships and family business dynamics is film. In this course, students will learn to critically analyze and evaluate family relationships and family business dynamics through the examination of various television shows and films and how they reflect research and theories. By watching, analyzing, and discussing these films, the complexities of family businesses will come to life, offering students a unique glimpse into how family relationships impact their business, and in turn, how the business affects family relationships. By utilizing television shows and films, students will also have the opportunity to diagnose the roots of family conflicts and see how having a “healthy family” helps to ensure a “healthy business.”


HONR 3310-32
Go with the Flow: Water in the Environment

Times: Tue, Fri / 8:00-9:40am
CRN: 39221

Malcolm Hill, Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences
COS

What do howler monkeys in Costa Rica; Australian bauxite miners; people in San Francisco; indigenous people, ship captains and wind surfers on the Columbia River; people charging their cell phones in St. Malo, France; people keeping up with building subsidence in Mexico City; and farmers along the Nile River, all have in common? Their health and economic well-being hinges in important ways on local, national and international approaches to protecting, and exploiting, water resources. Costa Rica’s National Parks program in the 1970s protected many of its high mountain peaks to ensure watershed protection for the future. Australia ships bauxite to Iceland, to be refined into metal, using Iceland’s hydropower resources. Hetch Hetchy Valley was almost a part of Yosemite National Park, but San Francisco prevailed in a power struggle within California, to dam the valley for a water supply for that city. The Columbia River drains 7 US states and British Columbia, an extensive dam network has modified the flow to capture water for hydropower, control the water depth to permit deep-water ships to operate, but at the cost of making barriers to salmon migration which impacts the livelihood of indigenous Americans who have traditionally fished as an economic mainstay. The Rance River dam traps seawater upstream at high tide, and lets it out on the falling tide cycle, it can generate electricity on both rising and falling tides. Groundwater pumping since the 1850s in Mexico City has caused surface subsidence in the deep lakebed sediments the city is built on. Nile River farmers used to have their fields flooded seasonally which brought fresh nutrient-rich silt, but today’s network of dams is designed not to ‘waste’ floodwater so other ways of maintaining soil fertility are an outcome. We will take a project-based approach to studying problems like these, to learn the science behind the issues, and the approaches to policy making that either seem to have been effective or not effective from the perspective of particular interest groups. “Water in the environment” will be our theme, and we will work together as a class to identify a number of specific study areas.